Six Minute Story

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February 21, 2014 at 11:00am
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Do all the other things, the ambitious things—travel, get rich, get famous, innovate, lead, fall in love, make and lose fortunes, swim naked in wild jungle rivers (after first having it tested for monkey poop)—but as you do, to the extent that you can, err in the direction of kindness. Do those things that incline you toward the big questions, and avoid the things that would reduce you and make you trivial. That luminous part of you that exists beyond personality—your soul, if you will—is as bright and shining as any that has ever been. Bright as Shakespeare’s, bright as Gandhi’s, bright as Mother Theresa’s. Clear away everything that keeps you separate from this secret luminous place. Believe it exists, come to know it better, nurture it, share its fruits tirelessly.

— 

George Saunders

February 20, 2014 at 1:00pm
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I always say that writing, for me, is like going to church. When I’m out of my way, when my ego is hushed, when my propensity for judging myself and editing myself is silenced for a moment, I’m feeling pretty close to God and everything that’s good.

— Sheryl Crow

11:00am
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We forget that every good that is worth possessing must be paid for in strokes of daily effort. We postpone and postpone, until those smiling possibilities are dead. Whereas ten minutes a day of poetry, of spiritual reading or meditation, and an hour or two a week at music, pictures, or philosophy, provided we began now and suffered no remission, would infallibly give us in due time the fulness of all we desire. By neglecting the necessary concrete labor, by sparing ourselves the little daily tax, we are positively digging the graves of our higher possibilities.

— William James

February 11, 2014 at 1:00pm
5,720 notes
Reblogged from explore-blog

Hemingway did his best work when he didn’t drink, then he drank himself to death and blew his head off with a shotgun. Someone asked John Cheever, “What’d you learn from Hemingway?” and he said “I learned not to blow my head off with a shotgun.”

— 

In an interview with The FixMary Karr debunks the toxic mythology that it is necessary to be damaged in order to be creative. My own vehement defiance to that mythology is what led me to choose Ray Bradbury – the ultimate epitome of creating from joy rather than suffering – as the subject of my contribution to The New York Times’ The Lives They Lived.

Pair with Karr on why writers write.

(via explore-blog)

(Source: , via blessedisthematch)

11:00am
4,007 notes
Reblogged from humansofnewyork
humansofnewyork:

"I had to quit music when I had kids because I spent all my time on them."
"Do you regret it?"
"Absolutely not, because when I picked up the guitar again, the music came out different."

humansofnewyork:

"I had to quit music when I had kids because I spent all my time on them."

"Do you regret it?"

"Absolutely not, because when I picked up the guitar again, the music came out different."

(via blessedisthematch)

February 10, 2014 at 3:41pm
203 notes
Reblogged from butthorn

wandererbynature said: I love your art. I've always wanted to make stuff, but I have no idea how. Where did you learn?

butthorn:

First of all, thank you! I’m self taught. The only art classes I took were some in high school (I did poorly in them) and I took one life drawing class in college. 

The only useful advice I can think of is practice practice practice. Doodle on everything you can - notebooks, class assignments, receipts, napkins, canvas, whatever you can get your hands on. Just keep drawing. Go with what works for you, try different materials, try drawing things in different sizes. I found my niche in tiny watercolors after a long time.

Here’s a set of doodles from 2+ years ago

image

and something from the roughly 2 years since then mark

image

I think there’s some changes, at least in proportions and detail.

Oh, and if you get a chance, check out National Portfolio Day. You don’t need to be an art major or enrolled in school to attend. I’ve gone two years running and I feel like I get so much out of it every time. The first year I went, I brought a binder full of pop culture drawings, and the representative from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago asked “Have you ever considered drawing comics?” It was the biggest game changer for me.

Hope this helps! 

3:40pm
32,348 notes
Reblogged from sirmitchell
sirmitchell:

I’ve heard countless people say “I wish I could draw!”, to which I always say “You can!”
Anyone can be an artist, a writer, a musician or whatever it is you put your mind to. It doesn’t matter how old you are or how good you currently are at that thing. The only thing that matters is how much you want it. I REALLY wanted to be an artist, like, really bad. I would also love to learn an instrument, and I know I could, but I just haven’t given it the attention it requires. If you want to accomplish something, go out and do it. The only thing holding you back is yourself. Set a high goal and don’t stop until you get there!

sirmitchell:

I’ve heard countless people say “I wish I could draw!”, to which I always say “You can!”

Anyone can be an artist, a writer, a musician or whatever it is you put your mind to. It doesn’t matter how old you are or how good you currently are at that thing. The only thing that matters is how much you want it. I REALLY wanted to be an artist, like, really bad. I would also love to learn an instrument, and I know I could, but I just haven’t given it the attention it requires. 

If you want to accomplish something, go out and do it. The only thing holding you back is yourself. Set a high goal and don’t stop until you get there!

(via blessedisthematch)

May 8, 2013 at 3:16pm
820 notes
Reblogged from lightsnsights

Money is the cheapest thing. Freedom is the most expensive.

— Bill Cunningham (via lightsnsights)

(via wildhobbitjam)

March 16, 2013 at 3:26pm
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Amazon bestseller nets author pretty much nothing →

This guy’s novel went to the top of Amazon’s bestseller list for a week. He made $12,000 total. 

What does this say about what writers should strive for? “Getting published” doesn’t sound like a big win anymore.

August 9, 2012 at 10:58am
3 notes

Mitch Hedberg’s notebooks